Issue: HIV

The health problem to be addressed is HIV infections among older adults aged 65 years and above. According to the CDC, nearly half of the people living with HIV in the United States are aged 50. In 2015, 47% of all new HIV diagnoses involved people aged 50 years and above. For the final project, the research question will be exploring some of the factors that contribute to new HIV infections among older people.  The findings of the research will help explore the factors that lead to new HIV infections among people aged 50 years and above to help inform research and prevention strategies targeting this population. Research has shown that sexually risky behaviors are some of the contributing factors for new HIV infections among older Americans and that 70% of men aged 50 years and above have reported sexual activity with a partner in the past year (Pilowsky & Wu, 2015). 

Section II.

Pilowsky, D. & Wu, L. (2015). Sexual risk behaviors and HIV risk among Americans aged 50 years or older: A review. Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation, 6, 51-60.

This article explores the sexual behaviors that increase the risk of older Americans being infected with HIV. The research method used was a review of past literature regarding unsafe sexual behaviors among people aged 65 years and older. The researchers found out that older Americans often underestimate their risk of being infected with HIV.

Mahy, M., Christine, A., Stanecki, K. & Shona. W. (2014). Increasing trends in HIV prevalence among people aged 50 years and older: evidence from estimates and survey data. AIDS Online, 28, S453–S459.

The purpose of this article is to present the most recent estimates on HIV prevalence among people aged 50 years and above. The study involved a survey conducted to obtain estimates on the number of people aged 50 years and above and diagnosed with HIV. The study found out that the HIV prevalence rates have steadily increased in recent years and that HIV surveillance action should incorporate the older age groups.

Tavoschi, L., Dias, J. & Pharris, A. (2017). New HIV diagnoses among adults aged 50 years or older in 31 European countries 2004–15: an analysis of surveillance data. Lancet, 4(11), 514-521.

According to this article, there has been an increase in new HIV diagnoses among older adults in the European countries. The main research question was to investigate factors associated with HIV diagnosis in older adults between 2004 and 2015.  The study found out that new diagnoses stood at 2·6 per 100 000 population suggesting an increase in new HIV diagnosis among older people.

Tavoschi, L., Madeddu, G. & Pharris, A. (2017). New HIV Diagnoses among Older Adults in the EU/EEA: Missed Opportunities and Barriers to Testing. J AIDS Clin Res, 8(12): 750.

According to the article, the rates of new HIV infections among older adults in Europe has been increasing and the authors conducted an investigative study to explore the factors that influence HIV infection, diagnosis and testseeking behavior in the target population. The researchers found out that older people only test for HIV based on the perception of risk.

Tanyi, P., Pelser, A. & Okeibunor, J. (2018). HIV/AIDS and older adults in Cameroon: Emerging issues and implications for caregiving and policy-making. Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS, 15(1).

In this study, the researchers explored emerging issues related to HIV infections among older adults. Using in-depth interviews and focus groups, the researchers found out that older people with HIV had difficulties looking after themselves making them vulnerable to health, social, economic and psychological challenges.

Tiffany, H., Miriam, R. & Wafaa, E. (2018). Achieving the fourth 90: healthy aging for people living with HIV. AIDS, 32(12) – p 1563–1569.

According to this article, the availability of ART has made HIV a manageable condition and the number of older people with HIV has increased as a result. The article explores how older people can age with HIV and finds out that older people deal with unique challenges while managing HIV.

One research gap that emerges from the annotated bibliography is the factors that contribute to the increase in new HIV infections among the older adults. Research in this area is therefore necessary.

 

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